Babil, Irrfan Khan’s son, shares photos of actor’s former bedroom in Madh Island home and some childhood memories

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Irrfan Khan in a flashback (courtesy babil.i.k)

Strong points

  • Babil shared some photos of his father’s “old room”
  • “This is where he did most of his work,” Babil wrote in his post
  • Babil also shared a few of her childhood memories of the bedroom.

New Delhi:

Babil, the son of Irrfan Khan, who often remembers his late father with emotional posts on social media, let us step into the actor’s ‘old bedroom’ at their old home on Madh Island, a scenic destination on the north coast of Mumbai, away from the hustle and bustle of the city that never sleeps. “This is my father’s old room by the beach before we moved to town. This is where he did most of his work,” Babil wrote captioned a bunch of photos from the room that belonged to Irrfan Khan. Babil said it was also the actor’s sanctuary and workplace. Babil, who is studying cinema in London, attached some priceless keepsakes which he associated with the play and shared a thought Irrfan Khan believed in as an actor. “As I study theater now, I think of one of the acting ideas he used to implement – that the profession has immense emotional similarities to acting as a child,” a- he wrote. Irrfan Khan, who was diagnosed with cancer in 2018, died in Mumbai on April 29. He was 53 years old.

Babil said that as a kid his father’s bedroom would make him feel like fictional Hollywood hitman John Wick at times and sometimes a drummer in the face of a fierce pitcher: “At 9 years old, when you hold this cricket bat in the walls of your room, you can feel a roar from the stadium and see a bowler rushing to knock your head off. When I held that Nerf Gun in my hands my dad’s empty room was still going echoed in the silence of Madh Island, but at that point I was John Wick surrounded by bad guys with machine guns, gunshots everywhere, and you can hear them, you know? I was a woman once, after having watched Chak De! India and I would get excited while dribbling around imaginary defenders, then I would really shoot that solid ball with my hockey stick and break something. Oh, I would always break something, my would become so pi ** ed. I think you have to find the child in you and keep it alive, whatever your age. “

Read the post on Babil’s Nostalgia here:

This is my father’s old room near the beach before he moved to town. This is where he did most of his work. As I study acting now, I think of one of the acting ideas he used to implement; that the profession has immense emotional similarities to playing as a child; at age 9, when you hold this cricket bat inside your bedroom walls, you can feel a roar from the stadium and see a bowler rushing to knock your head off. When I held that nerf gun in my hands, my father’s empty room still echoed in the silence of Madh Island, but at that point I was John Wick surrounded by bad guys with machine guns, gunfire everywhere, and you can hear them, you know? I was a woman once, after watching chak from India and getting excited to dribble around imaginary defenders, then I really shot that solid ball with my hockey stick and broke something. Oh I would always break something, my would be so pissed off. I think you have to find the child in you and keep it alive, regardless of your age.

A post shared by Babil Khan (@ babil.i.k) on

Here are some of Babil’s previous posts, in which he shared anecdotes about Irrfan Khan as an actor and father:

5 years too long, And now you’re a stranger 5 years in love, Pickin straws the haystack Flipping through the pages of stakes Books I’ve never read. And that’s just half of it The other half is you, Shining through the wicked winter moon, I wish I could have tucked into your shoes. You have come so far. And I’m always just a little too late. Plucking the strings of my sitar to soothe, Those Monday morning blues And I continued like the rebellious son, In the wayward sun, but found myself wandering the wasteland. I was stoned when I saw my mother cry. I may never win. For I will never forget myself, the unforgivable sin. Blood on his lips paralyzed my heart. Pierced my soul like an unyielding dart. My, my mom, tell me you love me too. My, my mom, I would give anything for you. (Yo bro, you know I love you more than life itself.) @Sikdarsutapa

A post shared by Babil Khan (@ babil.i.k) on

Do you know one of the most important things my dad taught me as a film student? Before going to film school he warned me that I should prove myself because Bollywood is rarely respected in world cinema and at such times I have to inform about Indian cinema which escapes our Bollywood control. Unfortunately, this has happened. Bollywood was not respected, no awareness of Indian cinema of the 60s and 90s or of the credibility of public opinion. There was literally only one lecture in the world cinema segment on Indian cinema called “Bollywood and Beyond”, which was also broadcast in a laughing classroom. it was even difficult to have a meaningful conversation about real Indian cinema from Satyajit Ray and K. Asif. You know why? Because we, as an Indian audience, refused to evolve. My dad gave his life trying to elevate the art of acting in the unfavorable conditions of the 2000s Bollywood and alas for most of his journey was defeated at the box office by guys with six pack abs delivering theatrical and law-defying one-liners. of physics and reality, photoshopped article songs, just blatant sexism and identical conventional representations of patriarchy (and you have to understand, being defeated at the box office means the majority of the investment in Bollywood would go to winners, engulfing us in a vicious cycle). Because we as an audience wanted this, we loved it, all we were looking for was entertainment and safety of thought, so afraid of seeing our delicate illusion of reality shattered, therefore rejecting any change in perception. Any effort to explore the potential of cinema and its implications for humanity and existentialism has at best been kept aside. Now there’s a change, a new scent blowing in the wind. A new youth in search of a new meaning. We must stand our ground, not let this thirst for a deeper meaning be quelled again. A strange feeling assailed when Kalki was trolled for looking like a boy when she cut her hair short, it’s pure suppression of potential. (Although I don’t appreciate that Sushant’s disappearance has now become a whirlwind of political debate, but if a positive change comes along, Taoist style, we embrace it.)

A post shared by Babil Khan (@ babil.i.k) on

Babil, the son of Irrfan Khan, recently made headlines several emotional thoughts on Instagram, writing about not wanting to be judged on the basis of religion. “Don’t judge me by my religion,” read one of her many Instagram stories. Babil is the eldest of Irrfan Khan’s two sons with his wife Sutapa Sikdar.

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